ohio capitol

Ohio School Safety Center Unveiled At First Official Meeting

A group of administrators and advocates tasked with developing recommendations for school security met for the first time on Tuesday.

The Ohio School Safety Center held its first-ever meeting with 42 school administrators and security advocates from across the state on Tuesday.

The center, created by Gov. Mike DeWine in August amid growing outcry about the mass shooting in Dayton that killed nine people, is housed within the Ohio Department of Public Safety.

“I think it’s an opportunity to support an important issue for our students, one that I see come up quite a bit as a school psychologist,” group member Bradley Paramore, president of the Ohio School Psychologists Association, told WOSU.

Eight employees of the state homeland security department have been moved from other part-time duties to focus solely on school safety, according to The Columbus Dispatch. Staff members are already fielding calls from tipsters concerned about bullying, self harm and threats to school safety. Information is then quickly passed on to law enforcement and school administrators.

The working group of school officials and experts will meet periodically to work on recommendations and guidelines for school security. In addition, the center plans to host a safety summit next summer, the Dispatch reported.

“We have a dedicated team waking up every day thinking of new ways to improve school safety,” state Public Safety Director Tom Stickrath told the working group.

Paramore told WOSU that the string of school shootings that have plagued U.S. schools weigh heavily on the minds of students, staff and parents. Within that environment, interventions should be in place to improve school climate and address student mental health before it deteriorates into violence.

"Putting positive interventions and supports in place where we can address issues that students are struggling with, or that they show up at school with, can have a positive impact on schools and school performance," Paramore said.

About the Author

Haley Samsel is an Associate Content Editor for the Infrastructure Solutions Group at 1105 Media.

Featured

  • Making Safety and Security Intrinsic to School Design

    Public anxieties about school safety are escalating across the country. According to a 2023 Gallup report, 44% of parents fear for their child’s physical safety at school, a 10 percentage-point increase since 2019. Unfortunately, these fears are likely to increase if the incidence of school tragedies continues to mount. As a result, school leaders are now charged with two non-negotiable responsibilities. The first, as always, is to ensure kids have what they need to learn, grow, and thrive. Sadly, their second responsibility is to keep the children in their care safe from threats and physical danger. Read Now

  • Unlocking Peace of Mind

    In a perfect world, every school would have an unlimited budget to help secure their schools. In reality, schools must prioritize what budget they have while navigating the complexities surrounding school security and lockdown Read Now

  • Emerging Campus Access Control Solutions

    Emerging solutions in campus access control can mean different things. Usually, we expect the topic to focus on the very latest in door security products and solutions that have just been recently released or are about to be launched. After all, staying up on improvements to keep campuses safer is critical. Plus, it’s always interesting and exciting to learn what’s new and how innovations are going to better protect lives and assets and help the industry be even more successful. Read Now

  • Here’s How Instructional Audio Can Play a Key Role in School Safety

    Ensuring the safety of students and employees is critical in today’s educational environment. While the threat of a school shooting is in the back of everyone’s mind, the truth is there are many possible scenarios that could crop up at any time in classrooms, hallways, and other school spaces—from fights or altercations to a sick child or staff member who requires emergency attention. Read Now

Webinars